Category: Gravitational Engineering

Comment on Oregon State University Internet for MagnetoTellurics

https://ngf.oregonstate.edu/ngf-data-portal Hello, I have been looking at global sensor networks for the Internet Foundation. Now magnetotelluric networks. I notice you have data at IRIS, but for visitors to your OregonState.edu site, it seems hard to know where you data would be on IRIS.edu. I have been asking around, and there do not seem to be
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Comment on FIRST STUDY OF USING GRAVITATIONAL SIGNAL GENERATOR FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF THE GRAVITY SPEED

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329838665_FIRST_STUDY_OF_USING_GRAVITATIONAL_SIGNAL_GENERATOR_FOR_THE_MEASUREMENT_OF_THE_GRAVITY_SPEED/comments The gravitational potential and the magnetic potential overlap. They are part of the same potential, but they have different spatial frequencies. In a simple picture they are made of particles of different sizes, mixed to make one potential field. The energy density of the gravitational fields is much larger than the corresponding magnetic field.
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Note in Houston Astronomical Society about Gravitational Engineering

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AstronomyHouston I have been looking at all the radio astronomy groups on the Internet. There are a lot of them, at all levels of age and experience and size. I am trying to see how many of the ground and orbiting networks are also picking up signals in the nanoHertz to GHz range. That includes
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NANOGrav raw observing data – merging all global sensor networks on the Internet

Hello, I was visiting https://data.nanograv.org/ to see what kind of data you are sharing online.  I am tracking most all the sensor networks on the Internet, especially the emerging ones. If I understand this talk by Steve Taylor at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UptA7pkARo you are only observing at widely separated times for about 30 minutes? He talks about
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Is anyone doing continuous quantum measurements? Are you picking up gravity, seismic, magnetic, ELF and other noise?

As the quantum detectors get more sensitivity they should be picking up fluctuations in the local gravitational potential and electromagnetic background fields of the earth. But I have not seen anyone running a detector continuously for the days or weeks or months needed to do the required correlations to trace things out. Nor, do I
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Another try to explain why gravimeter magnetometer arrays are important

Andy, Thanks.  I have searched the Internet almost every day for the last 23 years, and have learned never to think something doesn’t exist.   Thanks for confirming that there are likely no permanent magnetometer arrays.  There could still be someone who does it for fun, and doesn’t tell anyone. I wrote some notes below about
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Comment on finding help on Hackaday.io – building global communities for learning

​Is there a way to ask for help? I have many projects that I would like to try, but often am missing critical pieces that probably are obvious or trivial for someone else. For instance, I want to write algorithms for pan tilt zoom imaging with multiple cameras. The algorithms are relatively easy – but
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Comment on Geomagnetically Induced Current Data

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Please_I_want_to_enquire_How_can_I_download_Geomagnetically_induced_current_data_GIC_of_one_minute_time_resolution_data Alaa Mohamed, Today I was just reviewing “global conductivity models” and “geomagnetically induced currents” for the Internet Foundation. The common practice seems to be to use 1D and 3D conductivity models, then use the fairly dense magnetotelluric (MT) arrays for the changing magnetic fields that induce the changes. There are LOTS of electromagnetic datasets.
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Another comment on Schrodinger and noise in the vacuum

L.D. Edmonds I did not mean to stir things up. I track global sensor networks (the communities of people working together) and many of the “quantum” and “gravitational” and “quark gluon” and “neutrino” groups get rather esoteric in their language and methods. The methods are not too hard, but sorting out what people mean by
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Comment on Was Schrodinger’s equation born from statistics?

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Was_Schrodingers_equation_born_from_statistics The Schrodinger equation, as it is used most of the time, is the 3D wave equations with stationary solutions. In every practical application you use dynamic models where the resonances and states are part of the constraints. The vacuum states usually require working with the nonlinear Schrodinger solutions. And most scattering and resonance problems
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