Pet peeves – Wikipedia, sites, videos, classes, universities, schools – talking about things that could easily be shared for real

Samuel, I hesitate to reply to many of your comments because in Videos 3-7, I cover a lot of issues and resolve them. I am not even sure what still remains to be done. All I can suggest is you keep a log of your specific people where they might need a deeper look. If I don’t cover them in the next videos you watch, tell me and I will try again. I feel I am learning from doing these. In videos 6 and 7 I had to separate people who were merged or connected wrong.

Learning to recognize that and clean it up in a conservative and clear way is the type of paradigm that shows up often in research and these collaborative efforts. I have to do things like that when merging Internet groups or topics. Or like taking all the wikipedia pages that connect to a theme or topic and show how they are all related, or duplicated. My favorite example, while not familiar to many people, is site:wikipedia.org “Fourier Transform” which shows 7680 places in wikipedia where that mathematical method is mentioned. Yet those thousands of mentions in many hundreds of articles are not connected in a concise and clear way. And, nowhere on Wikipedia is there a single place where this rather routine method is available for the hundreds of millions of visitors to Wikipedia – and many students of all ages – to use. It is an easy computer problem, yet every person is forced to learn and create it from scratch – when the best introduction is to simply uses it – with sound recordings, videos data streams, images, and time series data from billions of sensors in the world.

The time wasted is horrendous when Wikipedia articles, university websites, teaching websites and articles all TALK about something, rather than just letting people use it. That “only talking about something that could be shared” is one of my pet peeves on the Internet, in education, research and society in general. People only talk about things and never let anyone see or use it. Like take a dance class and they never dance. Or talking about welding but never pick up a torch. Talk about global climate change, but never work on models and real data. Or talk about astronomy, but never share real data from real telescopes. It is endless and a trillions of dollars of wasted time in the world.

Richard K Collins

About: Richard K Collins

Director, The Internet Foundation Studying formation and optimized collaboration of global communities. Applying the Internet to solve global problems and build sustainable communities. Internet policies, standards and best practices.


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