Notes on Individual, Family, National, International and Global Collaborations – “Global Communities”

Draft – contact me if you have questions.  I am writing a separate proposal, rather a model for all global communities.
Dr Hossain,
I am reading many of the articles you have collaborated on related to spinal cord injury in Bangladesh, training, and impact on families.  I see you trying to use phones and the Internet.
Are these still true:
“A community-based intervention involving regular telephone calls and home visits was administered as intended and was well received by the recipients of the care. Nonetheless, people with SCI in Bangladesh face economic and social problems which cannot be fully addressed by this type of intervention alone.” CRP Community Based Rehabilitation?
“Many people with SCI in Bangladesh are house-bound, unemployed, living in poverty and have pressure ulcers. They experience moderate rates of depression and report limited quality of life.”
“Many people with SCI in Bangladesh are unemployed and living in poverty with a reduced quality of life and participation. Pressure ulcers are a common complication.”
“In Bangladesh, SCI have profound financial implications for individuals and their families and causes extreme poverty. This is because those most often injured are young and the main income earners for their families”
“In Bangladesh, approximately one in five people with spinal cord injury who are wheelchair-dependent die within two years of discharge from hospital. Most deaths are due to sepsis from potentially preventable pressure ulcers.” .. “The most common cause of death after discharge was sepsis due to pressure ulcers.”
I was wondering what the CIVIC plan cost, and who paid?
Richard Collins, Director, The Internet Foundation
The cost of providing a community-based model of care to people with spinal cord injury, and the healthcare costs and economic burden to households of spinal cord injury in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33495581/
A community-based intervention to prevent serious complications and death 2 years after discharge in people with spinal cord injury in Bangladesh (CIVIC): a randomised trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32917948/ – Should have focused on sepsis and quality of life. Real time network. Education, Jobs, Communities
Understanding how a community-based intervention for people with spinal cord injury in Bangladesh was delivered as part of a randomised controlled trial: a process evaluation at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32541882/ – push model, too expensive
Loss of work-related income impoverishes people with SCI and their families in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31772346/
University of Sydney, John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research,  Lisa Harvey
Community-based interventions to prevent serious complications following spinal cord injury in Bangladesh: the CIVIC trial statistical analysis plan at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31023347/
Health status, quality of life and socioeconomic situation of people with spinal cord injuries six years after discharge from a hospital in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30787428/
Protocol for process evaluation of CIVIC randomised controlled trial: Community-based Interventions to prevent serious Complications following spinal cord injury in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30012798/ – University of Sydney Australia
International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) database: Asian Spinal Cord Network (ASCoN) Pilot Project [IDAPP] at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29844928/ – India, Thailand, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Nepal. – Not database, “global community”
Socio-demographic and injury-related factors contributing to activity limitations and participation restrictions in people with spinal cord injury in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29093546/ CRP Community Based Rehabilitation
Participants scored low in total community integration and life satisfaction, suggesting there is a great need to develop interventions by governmental and non-governmental organizations to better integrate individuals with spinal cord injury in the community. Implications for Rehabilitation Government and non-government organizations should offer disability friendly public transportation facilities for individuals with spinal cord injury so that they can return to education, resume employment, and involve in social activities. Entrepreneurs and businesses should develop assistive devices featuring low technology, considering the rural structure and housing conditions in Bangladesh. Innovations being made in assistive technology should be supported by subsidies and grants. They should also plan to offer injury appropriate employment opportunities for individuals who suffer major injuries like spinal cord injury in Bangladesh. Housing facilities with accessible bathrooms, kitchens and stairs should be designed and offered for this population to improve their ability to self-care and decrease the dependence on caregivers for household tasks such as – cooking meals and taking care of children.
Cost-effectiveness analysis of telephone-based support for the management of pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury in India and Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28809389/ – About $2400 per participant for 12 weeks. N?
Community integration and life satisfaction among individuals with spinal cord injury living in the community after receiving institutional care in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28637130/
A pilot randomised trial of community-based care following discharge from hospital with a recent spinal cord injury in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27311454/ University of Sydney Australia
Community-based InterVentions to prevent serIous Complications (CIVIC) following spinal cord injury in Bangladesh: protocol of a randomised controlled trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26743709/
Psychological and socioeconomic status, complications and quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries after discharge from hospital in Bangladesh: a cohort study at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26458967/
Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-based support versus usual care for treatment of pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury in low-income and middle-income countries: study protocol for a 12-week randomised controlled trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26220871/
A massive open online course (MOOC) can be used to teach physiotherapy students about spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25498151/
Mobile phones improve case detection and management of malaria in rural Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23374585/
Training unsupported sitting does not improve ability to sit in people with recently acquired paraplegia: a randomised trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21684489/ – Lisa Harvey, 6 weeks * 90 minutes is 9 hours, NVL
Hand function of C6 and C7 tetraplegics 1 – 16 years following injury at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11224013/ – Patrick Weber
Health-related financial catastrophe, inequality and chronic illness in Bangladesh at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23451102/ – The ones receiving the most care paid the most.
Two-year survival following discharge from hospital after spinal cord injury in Bangladesh at https://www.nature.com/articles/sc201592
A massive open online course (MOOC) can be used to teach physiotherapy students about spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25498151/
Richard K Collins

About: Richard K Collins

Director, The Internet Foundation Studying formation and optimized collaboration of global communities. Applying the Internet to solve global problems and build sustainable communities. Internet policies, standards and best practices.


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